Office of Compliance - Question of the Week

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Release: March 04, 2010
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Office of Athletic Compliance

Question of the Week Archives  

Question: It is permissible for a director of operations (or other non-coaching staff member with sport-specific responsibilities) to attend a local athletics event involving prospective student-athletes and have recruiting conversations with the prospective student-athlete's relatives or legal guardians who are attending the event.

A. True
B. False

Answer: B - False

NCAA Bylaw 13.1.2.1 states that all in-person, on- and off-campus recruiting contacts with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete's relatives or legal guardian(s) shall be made only by authorized institutional staff members. Such contact, as well as correspondence and telephone calls, by representatives of an institution's athletics interests is prohibited except as otherwise permitted in this section. Violations of this bylaw involving individuals other than a representative of an institution's athletics interests shall be considered institutional violations per Constitution 2.8.1; however, such violations shall not affect the prospective student-athlete's eligibility. (Revised: 8/5/04)

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Question: When may non-coaching staff members telephone prospective student-athletes?

Answer: Day after the prospective student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent with that institution.

According to the following NCAA Bylaws...

Bylaw 13.1.3.4.1.2 states that after the calendar day on which a prospective student athlete signs a National Letter of Intent, a noncoaching institutional staff member or a coach who does not count toward the numerical limitations in

Bylaw 11.7.4 may make telephone calls to or receive telephone calls from the prospective student-athlete (or the prospective student-athlete's parents or legal guardians). For an institution not using the National Letter of Intent in a particular sport, or for a prospective student-athlete who is not eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent (e.g., four-year college transfer), a noncoaching institutional staff member or a coach who does not count toward the numerical limitations in

Bylaw 11.7.4 may make telephone calls to or receive telephone calls from a prospective student-athlete (or the prospective student-athlete's parents or legal guardians) after the calendar day on which the prospective student-athlete signs the institution's written offer of admission and/or financial aid.

(Adopted: 1/14/08 effective 8/1/08, Revised: 8/8/08)

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Question: Dana Digs is a volleyball prospective student-athlete. Dana will be enrolling at Big Time College in the fall and will be participating on the volleyball team. Dana would like to get a jump start on her academic career, so she has decided to attend summer school during the first session at Big Time College. The coach is unable to provide Dana with financial assistance, so she will be paying for her own summer school costs. Once Dana enrolls and attends summer classes, is she still considered a prospective student-athlete? Can she receive benefits like the other student-athletes?

Answer: No
With the adoption of NCAA Proposal 2008-14, Dana would not be subject to the contact restrictions in Bylaw 13. Additionally, Dana would no longer be considered a prospective student-athlete for purposes of Bylaw 16 (Awards and Benefits).

Please note that this proposal has an immediate effective date.

RECRUITING -- DEFINITIONS AND APPLICATIONS -- PROSPECTIVE STUDENT-ATHLETE -- ENROLLMENT AND ATTENDANCE IN SUMMER CLASSES PRIOR TO INITIAL FULL-TIME ENROLLMENT

Status: Adopted, 60-Day Override Period

Intent: To specify that an individual shall no longer be considered a prospective student-athlete for purposes of the contact limitations in Bylaw 13 and shall be considered a student-athlete for purposes of Bylaw 16 at the point in which he or she officially registers and enrolls and attends classes in an institution's summer term prior to initial full-time enrollment.

13.02.11 Prospective Student-Athlete.

A prospective student-athlete is a student who has started classes for the ninth grade. In addition, a student who has not started classes for the ninth grade becomes a prospective student-athlete if the institution provides such an individual (or the individual's relatives or friends) any financial assistance or other benefits that the institution does not provide to prospective students generally. An individual remains a prospective student-athlete until one of the following occurs (whichever is earlier):

(a) The individual officially registers and enrolls in a minimum full-time program of studies and attends classes in any term of a four-year collegiate institution's regular academic year (excluding summer); or

(b) The individual participates in a regular squad practice or competition at a four-year collegiate institution that occurs before the beginning of any term; or (Revised: 1/11/89, 1/10/90)

(c) The individual officially registers and enrolls and attends classes during the summer prior to initial enrollment and receives institutional athletics aid. (Adopted: 4/28/05)

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Question: Cross Bar is a soccer student-athlete at Big North College. Cross graduated in the spring of 2008 but has returned this fall to play his final season. Cross is enrolled in a full-time course load this semester and all the hours can be applied toward the economics degree program. Cross, however, is categorized as an undecided student in the institution's computer system. Does Cross have to actually declare a major?

Answer: No
NCAA Staff Interpretation- 9/26/06- Postbaccalaureate Student-Athlete Taking Coursework toward Second Major or Degree (I/II/III)- states that a student-athlete who has graduated and is continuing as a full-time student at the same institution while taking course work that would lead to the equivalent of another major or degree as defined and documented by the institution is not required to officially declare or designate another major or degree. The student-athlete must be enrolled in course work that is acceptable toward any of the institution's other majors or degrees. [Reference: NCAA Divisions I, II, and III Bylaw 14.1.9 (graduate student/postbaccalaureate participation).]

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Question: It is permissible for a director of operations (or other non-coaching staff member with sport-specific responsibilities) to attend a local athletics event involving prospective student-athletes and have recruiting conversations with the prospective student-athlete's relatives or legal guardians who are attending the event. True or False?

Answer: The answer is False.
NCAA Bylaw 13.1.2.1 states that all in-person, on- and off-campus recruiting contacts with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete's relatives or legal guardian(s) shall be made only by authorized institutional staff members. Such contact, as well as correspondence and telephone calls, by representatives of an institution's athletics interests is prohibited except as otherwise permitted in this section. Violations of this bylaw involving individuals other than a representative of an institution's athletics interests shall be considered institutional violations per Constitution 2.8.1; however, such violations shall not affect the prospective student-athlete's eligibility. (Revised: 8/5/04)

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Question: The baseball coaches at College USA would like to provide several prospective student-athletes with complimentary admissions to attend a home game on saturday. The game is being played at a ballpark that is not their regular home facility. Can the coaches have contact with these prospective student-athletes after the game?

Answer: If the contest takes place outside of a contact period, it would NOT be permissible to have contact with the prospective student-athletes. If it is during a contact period, the coaches may have contact with these prospective student-athletes per NCAA Bylaw 13.1.1.1. Any contact that takes place during a contact period must count as an off-campus contact.

13.7.2.2 Home Games at Site Other than Regular Home Facility
If an institution schedules any regular-season home games at a site not designated as its regular home facility, the host institution may provide a maximum of three complimentary admissions to any such game for the exclusive use of a prospective student-athlete and those persons accompanying the prospective student-athlete. Tournament and postseason games are excluded. The institution shall not arrange or permit any other entertainment or payment of expenses, including transportation, except as permitted in Bylaw 13.5.3. (Revised: 4/24/03)

Contact with Prospective Student-Athletes at Home Contest at a Site Other than Regular Home Facility (I)

Interpretation: The committee confirmed that it is not permissible for institutional staff members to have recruiting contact outside a contact period with prospective student-athletes who receive complimentary admissions to a home contest conducted at a site other than the institution's home facility. Any permissible contact during a contact period must be counted as an off-campus contact.

[References: Division I Bylaws 13.01.3 (off-campus recruiting), 13.02.4.1 (contact period), 13.1.4 (recruiting calendars), 13.7.2.2 (home games at site other than regular home facility), an official interpretation (4/28/94, Item No. 4), and staff interpretation (12/12/07, Item No. 1), which has been archived]

13.1.1.1 High School Prospective Student-Athletes.
Off-campus recruiting contacts shall not be made with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete's relatives or legal guardians before July 1 following the prospective student-athlete's completion of the junior year in high school (July 15 in women's gymnastics). U.S. service academy exceptions to this provision are set forth in Bylaw 13.16.1. (Revised: 1/10/91 effective 7/1/91, 1/11/94 effective 3/15/94, 1/10/95, 1/14/97 effective 5/1/97, 10/28/97, 4/26/01 effective 8/1/01, 4/29/04 effective 8/1/04, 4/28/05, 1/9/06, 2/26/07)

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Question: Strike Out is a baseball student-athlete at College USA. Strike played in his first game of the season last Saturday. Stirke had pitched a few innings when the game was called on account of lightening. Since the game was not complete, does Strike utilize a season of competition?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Staff Interpretation - 11/18/87 - Use of Season of competition when event is not completed - states that student-athletes would be charged with a season of competition for any event (including scrimmages) in which they started participation; regardless of whether they finish (i.e., discontinued game due to inclement weather, contestant drops out of event) that particular event or contest. Determined that the student-athlete would be charged with a season of competition regardless of whether that individual's performance was included in the final scoring of the event.

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Question: Pooch Kick is a football prospective student-athlete who will be initially enrolling at College USA in the fall. Pooch really wants to be prepared for preseason camp, so he decides to start practicing on his own. In order to get used to College USA's equipment, Pooch asks the coaching staff if he can purchase a few balls and tees. College USA will be having a public sale at the end of April. Can Pooch purchase balls and tees at this public sale?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Educational Column- 3/18/04- Equipment and Apparel to Enrolled Student-Athletes and Prospects (I)- states that a student-athlete may retain athletics apparel items (not equipment) at the end of the individual's collegiate participation.

Used equipment may be purchased by the student-athlete on the same cost basis as by any other individual interested in purchasing such equipment and may be offered to student-athletes before other interested parties are aware of the opportunity to purchase the equipment.

Further, it is not permissible to sell equipment to prospective student-athletes unless the sale of equipment is made available to the general public. The sale of equipment must be publicized to the public generally and made available to all individuals on the same terms and conditions. [References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 13.2 (offers and inducements); 16.02.3 (extra benefit); 16.12.1.6 (Retention of Athletics Apparel and Equipment); an October 21, 1993 official interpretation (item reference: 1); and an October 23, 1986, official interpretation (item reference: p)].

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Question: With this week commencing NCAA postseason basketball tournaments, all institutional/conference staff members (including full-time, part-time, and student workers) are reminded that it is not permissible to engage in any gambling activity that involves intercollegiate athletics or professional athletics, through the internet, a bookmaker, a parlay card, or any other method employed by organized gambling.

This prohibition also includes participation in NCAA/NIT Tournament Bracket sheets in which an entry fee is required and money or any item of tangible value may be won. Previous NCAA major infractions cases involving staff members' participation in organized gambling activities have resulted in a number of institutional corrective actions, including termination of employment.

For more information concerning sports wagering, please visit the NCAA's interactive sports wagering website at www.dontbetonit.org.

NCAA Bylaw 10.02.1 Sports Wagering
Sports wagering includes placing, accepting or soliciting a wager (on a staff member's or student-athlete's own behalf or on the behalf of others) of any type with any individual or organization on any intercollegiate, amateur or professional team or contest. Examples of sports wagering include, but are not limited to, the use of a bookmaker or parlay card; Internet sports wagering; auctions in which bids are placed on teams, individuals or contests; and pools or fantasy leagues in which an entry fee is required and there is an opportunity to win a prize. (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

NCAA Bylaw 10.02.2 Wager
A wager is any agreement in which an individual or entity agrees to give up an item of value (e.g., cash, shirt, dinner) in exchange for the possibility of gaining another item of value. (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

NCAA Bylaw 10.3 Sports Wagering Activities
The following individuals shall not knowingly participate in sports wagering activities or provide information to individuals involved in or associated with any type of sports wagering activities concerning intercollegiate, amateur or professional athletics competition: (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

(a) Staff members of an institution's athletics department;
(b) Non-athletics department staff members who have responsibilities within or over the athletics department (e.g., chancellor or president, faculty athletics representative, individual to whom athletics reports);
(c) Staff members of a conference office; and
(d) Student-athletes.

Answer: Don't Bet On It!

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Question: During the summer vacation period, a student-athlete voluntarily asks to meet with the head coach regarding goals for the upcoming academic year. Is this permissible?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Official Interpretation- 10/8/87- Voluntary consultation with coach not considered 'practice activity'- states that it is permissible for an individual student-athlete to consult voluntarily with his or her coach outside the established playing season, provided the student-athlete and coach do not engage in actual drills or other physical aspects of practice activities. The coach is not permitted to request to see a particular student-athlete for this purpose, however.

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Question: Ground Ball is a baseball student-athlete at College USA. At the beginning of the season, Ground was issued a pair of tennis shoes. Because Ground was still using a pair of shoes from last year, he only wore the new pair 2-3 times. At the end of the season a friend of Ground's asked if he could buy the shoes, and Ground sold them for $50.00. Since Ground was allowed to keep his shoes at the end of the season, was it permissible for him to sell them and keep the money?

Answer: No
NCAA Educational Column- 8/18/03- 2003 Column No. 17 - Division I Bylaws 12.1.1, 12.5.2.1 and 16.1.2.2.1 - Student-Athletes Selling Items Received for Participation in Intercollegiate Athletics- states that pursuant to Bylaws 12.1.1, 12.5.2.1 and 16.12.2.1, it is impermissible for a student-athlete to sell any item received for intercollegiate athletics participation or exchange or assign such an item for another item of value, even if the student-athlete's name or picture does not appear on the item received for intercollegiate athletics participation. Therefore, a student-athlete is not permitted to sell awards received for participation, conference or national championships or special achievements per Bylaw 16.1.4.

The above fact pattern is an actual violation from the 2006-07 academic year. The student-athlete was declared ineligible and needed to have his eligibility reinstated by the NCAA.

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Question: The men's soccer coaches at College USA want to make sure their student-athletes stay in great shape during the summer while they are at home. The coaches have worked with the strength and conditioning coaches to create suggested work out programs for the student-athletes to take home with them. The coaches really want to make sure the student-athletes are following these programs, so they have also provided the student-athletes with forms to log their conditioning activities. The coaches would like to see these reports on a weekly basis, so they will provide them with pre-paid postage envelopes to mail the reports back to the coaches. Is it permissible for the coaches to provide such envelopes to the student-athletes?

Answer: No
Although the coaches are permitted to provide work out information to student-athletes during the summer, NCAA Official Interpretation-10/21/93- Monitoring of voluntary workout programs- states that outside an institution's playing season (including the summer), it is not permissible for the institution to require a student-athlete to report information related to his or her voluntary workout program or to provide any expenses (e.g., postage costs, cost of collect calls) for the purpose of reporting the progress of the voluntary workout program. [References: 16.02.3 (extra benefit), 17.02.1.1-(a) (countable athletically related activities), 17.02.1.2-(m) (non-countable athletically related activities) and 17.02.12 (practice)]

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Question: Cent R. Line is a prospective student-athlete that signed a National Letter of Intent (NLI) with Eastern College to play volleyball next year. Cent has also been approached by the basketball coaches about practicing with the team after the volleyball season is over. If Cent practices with the basketball team, does her scholarship still count against the volleyball team limits?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 15.5.8.2 states that a counter who practices or competes in basketball and one or more other sports (other than football) shall be a counter in basketball.

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Question: First N. Goal is a prospective student-athlete who is going to sign a National Letter of Intent on Wednesday to play football at Western College. The Head Coach at Western College would like to invite First's parents to the press conference announcing the incoming recruiting class. Is this permissible?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 13.10.9.2 states that an institution may make an announcement on the institution's campus for the sole purpose of presenting at one time to the media the names of all prospective student-athletes who have signed a National Letter of Intent or accepted written offers of admission and/or financial aid from that institution, with the understanding that no prospective student-athletes (or their friends or relatives) may be in attendance.

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Question: Full Twist is a diving prospective student-athlete that signed a National Letter of Intent (NLI) with State College in November. Full still needs to submit a few documents to complete her admissions and housing applications for fall 2008 enrollment. The coaches would like to send Full a text message to remind her of these important deadlines. Is it permissible for the coaches at State College to send Full text messages?

Answer: Yes
With the adoption of NCAA Proposal 207-47, coaches are permitted to send text messages to prospective student-athletes that have signed NLIs with their institutions. Please note that this piece of legislation has an immediate effective date.

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Question: The men's and women's track and field teams at College America are competing in the Winter Invitational this weekend. The invitational is an open meet, so not all participants will be collegiate student-athletes. A few of the participants will be prospective student-athletes that the coaches at College America are recruiting. Will the coaches at College America use evaluations when watching these prospective student-athletes compete against their student-athletes?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 13.1.8.16 states that an institution does not use an evaluation if the institution's team competes in an open meet (e.g., track and field meet) in which prospective student-athletes also compete. (Adopted: 1/10/92)

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Question: The men's basketball coaches at Eastern College are recruiting And One, a prospect on the west coast. The coaches were only able to watch And in person a few times, so they contact his high school and ask to purchase game film for the entire season. The high school normally charges $100 for the videos. The cost includes blank DVDS, postage and a fee for the service provided. Is it permissible for Eastern College to purchase the game film at this cost?

Answer: No
NCAA Official Interpretation- 11/7/07- Purchase of Video from a Prospective Student-Athlete's Educational Institution (I)- states that the committee confirmed that it is not permissible for an institution to purchase film or video (e.g., game film that includes prospective student-athletes) from a prospective student-athlete's educational institution at a cost that exceeds the value of a blank videotape or DVD (or other medium) and the cost of postage to receive the video. [References: Division I Bylaws 13.14.3.1 (published recruiting services), 13.14.3.2 (video services) and 13.15.1 (prohibited expenses)]

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Question: Point Guard is a basketball student-athlete that transferred to State College in January 2007. Point served his residency requirement during the spring 2007 and fall 2007 semesters, and he has been certified as eligible to compete. The fall semester officially ends on Friday, December 14th. The basketball team will be competing on Saturday, December 15th. The team will be leaving campus on Thursday, December 13th to travel to the game. Can Point travel with the team since they are leaving prior to the conclusion of the fall 2007 semester?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Staff Interpretation- 12/17/97- Student-Athlete Receiving Travel Expenses When Serving Residence Requirement- states that the NCAA staff has confirmed that a transfer student-athlete who is serving a residence requirement may receive travel expenses prior to the conclusion of the term to attend a competition that occurs after the date of the last scheduled examination listed in the institution's official calendar for that term, provided the institution can certify that the student-athlete will fulfill the obligations of the residence requirement during that trip, and the student-athlete does not represent the institution in competition until the day after the date of the last scheduled examination. [References: NCAA Bylaws 14.1.8 (change in eligibility status); 16.8.1.2 (competition while representing institution); and Official interpretation, 11/19/92, item 4]

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Question: On the initial day of the early signing period for the National Letter of Intent (NLI), the men's basketball program at College USA released the names of the prospective student-athletes that signed with their institution. The men's basketball program subsequently signs an additional prospective student-athlete during the spring signing period. The sports information office would like to update the biographies of the prospects who signed during the fall period, as during the interim two of the signees were named all-state and another won the state basketball championship. Is it permissible for the institution to release additional information about NLI signees?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Bylaw 13.10.9 states that publicity released by an institution concerning a prospective student-athlete's commitment to attend the institution shall occur only after the prospective student-athlete has signed a National Letter of Intent or after the prospective student-athlete's signed acceptance of the institution's written offer of admission and/or financial aid. Such communications (with no limit on number or content) may be released to media outlets at the institution's discretion except as limited by Bylaw 13.10.9.2. However, an institution is prohibited from purchasing or receiving commercial advertising (e.g., print, media or billboard) to be used to identify a prospective student-athlete by name or picture. Violations of this bylaw do not affect a prospective student-athlete's eligibility and are considered institutional violations per Constitution 2.8.1. (Revised: 1/14/97, 4/29/04 effective 8/1/04, 8/25/04)

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Question: The Head Volleyball Coach at Western College arranges for an off-campus contact with Outside Hitter, a prospective student-athlete, on Monday, November 19th. Outside has not signed an NLI during the early signing period, and the coach hopes to be able to convince her to sign with Western College before the deadline expires on November 21st. The coach brings the NLI to Outside's home and presents it to her in an effort to secure a signature. Is this permissible?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 13.1.6.7.1 states that in-person; off-campus delivery of a letter of intent by an institutional staff member is prohibited. The letter may be delivered by express mail, courier service, regular mail, electronic mail or facsimile machine.

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Question: Red Flag is a prospective student-athlete that will be initially enrolling full-time at a collegiate institution in January 2008. Red completed 14 core courses, earned the minimum GPA/test score combination and will graduate in December. One of Red's 14 core courses was earned through credit-by-examination. Can Red use this course to meet NCAA initial eligibility requirements?

Answer: No
NCAA Staff Interpretation- [10/24/07]- Use of Credit-by-Examination to Satisfy Minimum Initial-Eligibility Core-Curriculum Requirements (I/II)- states that membership services staff confirmed that credit earned only by examination shall not be used to satisfy the requirement of completing the minimum core curriculum for initial-eligibility purposes.

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Question: Big State University was approached by a local high school to participate in their annual fundraiser. The money raised will be used to buy equipment and uniforms for the athletic department. The high school requested a BSU t-shirt and hat and asked if BSU's conference office could also donate a t-shirt and hat.

Is it permissible for BSU to provide items for the high school's fundraiser? Is it permissible for BSU's conference office to provide items for the high school's fundraiser?

Answer: No to both questions
NCAA Bylaw 13.15.1.2 states that an institution may not provide funding, directly or indirectly or through paid advertisements, to benefit a high school athletics program. Violations of this bylaw do not affect a prospective student-athlete's eligibility and are considered institutional violations per Constitution 2.8.1

Although NCAA Bylaw 13.15.1.2 does not specifically identify conference offices in the prohibition of participating in high school fundraisers, it is not permissible because conference offices are required to adhere to the same rules and regulations as their member institutions.

Constitution, Article 3.3.4.1, states that member conferences of this Association agree to administer their athletics programs in accordance with the constitution, bylaws and other legislation of the Association.

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Question: Pen L. Tee is a soccer student-athlete from England. Prior to enrolling at Big State University, Pen played for a club team in his home town. The club team only provided Pen with actual and necessary expenses during the season, but a few of the players were provided a salary. Did Pen play on a professional team?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Bylaw 12.02.4 states that a professional team is any organized team that:

(a) Provides any of its players more than actual and necessary expenses for participation on the team, except as otherwise permitted by NCAA legislation. Actual and necessary expenses are limited to the following, provided the value of these items is commensurate with the fair market value in the locality of the player(s) and is not excessive in nature: (Revised: 4/25/02 effective 8/1/02)

(1) Meals directly tied to competition and practice held in preparation for such competition;
(2) Lodging directly tied to competition and practice held in preparation for such competition;
(3) Apparel, equipment and supplies;
(4) Coaching and instruction;
(5) Health/medical insurance;
(6) Transportation (expenses to and from practice competition, cost of transportation from home to training/practice site at the beginning of the season and from training/practice site to home at the end ofseason);
(7) Medical treatment and physical therapy;
(8) Facility usage; (Revised: 4/24/03)
(9) Entry fees; and (Revised: 4/24/03)
(10) Other reasonable expenses; or (Adopted: 4/24/03; Revised: 10/28/04)

(b) Declares itself to be professional (see Bylaw 12.1.2.4.1.1). (Revised: 8/8/02)

In situations like this, the institution will need to work with the NCAA Eligibility Center and/or the NCAA Reinstatement staff to determine the student-athlete's eligibility for intercollegiate sports.

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Question: Switch Hitter is a softball student-athlete at State College. Switch is interested in providing pitching lessons to earn extra money during the off-season. Can Switch use State College's facilities when providing these lessons?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 12.4.2.1 states that a student-athlete may receive compensation for teaching or coaching sport skills or techniques in his/her sport on a fee-for-lesson bases, provided:
1. institutional facilities are not used;
2. playing lessons shall not be permitted
3. the institution obtains and keeps on file documentation of the recipient of the lesson(s) and the fee for the lesson(s) provided during any time of year; and
4. the compensation is paid by the lesson recipient (or the recipient's family) and not another individual or entity
5. instruction to each individual is comparable to the instruction that would be provided during a private lesson when the instruction involves more than one individual at a time
6. the student-athlete does not use his/her name, picture or appearance to promote or advertise the availability of fee-for-lesson sessions.

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Question: Big State College men's basketball team is getting ready for their first official on-court practice on Friday, October 12th. They are going to practice from 7 pm - 8 pm and then have "midnight madness" with the women's team from 8 pm to 9 pm. If the team has not yet used their permissible 2 hours of individual skill-related instruction for the week that includes Oct. 12th, can they participate in individual skill-related instruction earlier in the day on the 12th (2 pm - 4 pm) while also still participating in practice at 7 pm?

Answer: Yes
As long as the team does not exceed 4 hours of countable athletically related activities on 10/12/07, and they have the 2 hours of individual skill-related instruction remaining, it would be permissible to participate in individual skill-related instruction from 2 pm - 4 pm and then practice from 7 pm - 9 pm.

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Question: Walk Off, Hr. is a freshman student at Big Time University. Walk decides to try out for the baseball team during the second week of classes. Walk makes the team and is told that he has to finish his registration with the NCAA Eligibility Center. Because Walk had already started classes at Big Time University, he asked the admissions office to send his SAT score to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Is that permissible?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 14.3.1.3.4 states that the minimum SAT or ACT score(s) used for initial-eligibility purposes must be provided to the NCAA Eligibility Center by the appropriate testing agency through an official test-score report. This bylaw became effective 8/1/07 for those student-athletes first entering a collegiate institution on or after 8/1/07.

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Question: Three N. Out, a senior prospective student-athlete, is being recruited by College USA in the sports of football and track. With the dead period for football occurring the week of the National Letter of Intent, would it be permissible for the track coaches to contact three off-campus during the football dead period?

Answer: Yes
An 11/21/91 NCAA Official Interpretation states that the dead period for recruiting purposes is sport applicable. Therefore, a multi-sport prospect that is being earnestly recruited in more than one sport could be recruited on- or off-campus during a permissible recruiting period even if a recruiting dead period is applicable in another sport in which the prospect is being recruited.

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Question: Kris Kringle, Head Women's Basketball Coach at Big Time University, wants to buy and send Christmas cards to her 8 NLI signees. Is this permissible?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 13.4.1.1 does not include greeting cards. A coach, however, could send an institutional note card wishing him/her a Merry Christmas. 13.4.1.1 Printed Recruiting Materials.

As specified below, an institution may provide the following printed materials to prospective student-athletes, coaches of prospective student-athletes or any other individual responsible for teaching or directing an activity in which a prospective student-athlete is involved: (Adopted: 4/28/05 effective 8/1/05 for publications prepared for the 2005-06 academic year and after)

(a) General Correspondence. General correspondence, including letters and postcards issued by the U.S. postal service (i.e., blank cards) and institutional note cards may be sent to a prospective student-athlete only by mail. Attachments to general correspondence may include materials printed on plain white paper with black ink. The content of all general recruiting correspondence to prospective student-athletes (or prospective student-athletes' parents or legal guardians) must be prepared by the head coach or one of the assistant coaches who count toward the numerical limitations in Bylaw 11.7.4 (see Bylaw 11.7.1.2). It is not permissible for an institution's president or chancellor or director of athletics to prepare general correspondence to prospective student-athletes. (Revised: 3/8/06)

(b) Business Cards.

(c) Camp Brochures. Camp brochures may be provided to a prospective student-athlete. Brochures are not restricted by content or design, but are restricted to a single two-sided sheet, not to exceed 17" X 22" when opened in full. (Note: These brochures may be provided to a prospective student-athlete prior to September 1 at the beginning of the prospective student-athlete's junior year in high school.) (See also Bylaw 12.5.1.7).

(d) Questionnaires. An institution may provide questionnaires to a prospective student-athlete prior to September 1 at the beginning of the prospective student-athlete's junior year in high school.

(e) Nonathletics Institutional Publications. An institution may provide nonathletics institutional publications available to all students at any time (e.g., official academic, admissions and student-services publications published by the institution and available to all students).

(f) NCAA Educational Material Published by the NCAA (e.g., NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete). (Note: This information may be provided to a prospective student-athlete prior to September 1 at the beginning of the prospective student-athlete's junior year in high school.)

(g) Athletics Publications. An institution may produce a recruiting brochure or media guide (but not both) and provide the publication to a prospective student-athlete. The publications may have only one color printing inside the cover and may not exceeding 8 1/2 by 11 inches in size and 208 pages in length. An institution may not produce a separate media guide that is intended to supplement the one permissible recruiting brochure or media guide. Such supplemental information (e.g., historical information, records) may be posted on the institution's Web site and may be printed in black and white, and provided to the media. An institution may not create a portfolio of information (e.g., pictures) to be shown to prospective student-athletes during the recruiting process unless it is considered the institution's one permissible athletics recruiting publications. An institution may produce additional media publications for separate purposes (e.g., postseason media guide, spring football practice guide), provided the additional publications are not provided to prospective student-athletes. (Revised: 3/23/05, 4/28/05, 5/12/05)

(h) Game Programs. Game programs (which may not include posters) may be provided to prospective student-athletes only during official and unofficial recruiting visits and may not be mailed.

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Question: Now that his institution has accepted a bowl invitation, a football student-athlete would like to make sure his family gets a hotel room for the game. Because the institution will be purchasing a large number of rooms, the hotel is offering a special rate to all persons associated with the institution. Is it permissible for the institution to provide this special rate information to the player's family?

Answer: Yes
An institution may reserve or secure lodging at any post-season event (other than a conference event) at a reduced or special rate for the parents/legal guardians and immediate family of a participating student-athlete. It is not permissible for the institution to cover any portion of the cost of lodging, including any costs associated with reserving or securing lodging.

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Question: Big Time University has a game this weekend at 1:00pm. The student-athletes will be provided breakfast and a lunch (pre-game meal) at the team hotel. The coaches would like to give the student-athletes $20 cash for dinner and a snack after the competition. Is it permissible for the coaches to provide the players with $20 cash for a post-game dinner and snack?

Answer: No
NCAA Official Interpretation- Cash in Lieu of Meals in Conjunction with Home Competition (I) [9/27/06] states, that it is not permissible to provide cash to student-athletes in lieu of discretionary meals (except for $10 in lieu of a meal following the competition) in conjunction with a home athletics contest. Further, the committee determined that following a home competition, regardless of the timing in which student-athletes are released by the appropriate institutional authority, an institution may provide only one meal (or snack) or $10 in lieu of that meal (or snack). [Reference: NCAA Division I Bylaw 16.5.2-(d)-(2)]

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Question: First Down, a football student-athlete, wants to transfer from College USA. He asks his coach for permission to speak to other schools. The Coach tells First Down that he can be contacted by other schools at the end of the fall semester. Is First Down entitled to a hearing, since permission to speak was not granted until the end of the semester?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Staff Interpretation (2/22/06)- Hearing Opportunity When Written Permission to Contact Four-Year College Prospect is Delayed (I/II/III) states: The membership services staff confirmed that if an institution delays a response to a student-athlete's request for permission to contact any other four-year institution or indicates that permission will be granted at a later date (e.g., at the end of the term), the institution must inform the student-athlete in writing within a reasonable time period following the initial request that he or she, on request, will be provided a hearing.

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Question: Big Time University football team has a home game this weekend at 7:00pm. The student-athletes will be provided breakfast and a lunch (pre-game meal) at the team hotel. The coaches would like to give the student-athletes money for dinner and a snack after the competition. Is this permissible?

Answer: No
NCAA Official Interpretation- Cash in Lieu of Meals in Conjunction with Home Competition (I) [9/27/06] states that it is not permissible to provide cash to student-athletes in lieu of discretionary meals (except for $10 in lieu of a meal following the competition) in conjunction with a home athletics contest. Further, the committee determined that following a home competition, regardless of the timing in which student-athletes are released by the appropriate institutional authority, an institution may provide only one meal (or snack) or $10 in lieu of that meal (or snack).

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Question: A prospect in women's basketball signs a National Letter of Intent during the early signing period (November 8 - 15). Prior to her signing, the institution committed an NCAA violation in her recruitment. The institution reported the violation and the prospect's eligbility was reinstated by the NCAA before she signed the NLI. Is the NLI that she signed valid?

Answer: Yes
The prospect was eligible at the time of signing. According to NLI Provision 7F, an NLI shall be declared null and void if the violation resultes in the need for the prospect's eligibility to be reinstated by the NCAA student-athlete reinforcement staff. It is the status of the student-athlete which renders the NLI null and void rather than the timing of the violation.

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Question: College USA sponsors both men's and women's swimming and diving. The coaching staff members are involved in practice activities and competition for both the men's and women's teams on a daily basis. There is a big event being held this weekend that includes both male and female participants. College USA would like to send four coaches to the event. Is this permissible?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Official Interpretation [8/6/91] states that member institutions with combined men's and women's sports programs. Reviewed the provisions of Bylaw 11.7.5.1 (contact and evaluation of prospects off campus) and determined that in combined programs (e.g., men's and women's track), it is permissible for all of the institution's coaches to be involved in off-campus recruitment activities at any one time; however, the institution may not exceed the limits on the number of coaches who may recruit prospective student-athletes at any one time in either the men's or women's sport; for example, if an institution conducts a combined men's and women's track program, no more than two coaches may be involved in off-campus recruiting activities of male track prospective student-athletes at any one time and no more than two coaches may be involved in off-campus recruiting activities of female track prospective student-athletes at any one time; determined, however, that all four coaches would be permitted to observe a competition in which both male and female prospective student-athletes participate.

NCAA Bylaw 11.7.4.1 states that a member institution that conducts a combined program in a sport (i.e., one in which all coaching staff members in the same sport are involved in practice activities or competition with both the men's and women's teams on a daily basis) may employ the total number of coaches specified separately for men and for women in that sport.

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Question: A volleyball prospective student-athlete wants to play for a club team in her home country. The club team required her to sign a contract which would allow her to play for that team as well as a professional team within the same organization. Assuming she does not compete for the professional team, does signing this contract jeopardize her amateur status?

Answer: No
If an individual signs a commitment/contract with an athletics organization that allows them to compete on both an amateur and professional team, they can retain amateur status simply by not competing on the professional team. Competing on the organization's amateur team is permissible. (NCAA Official Interpretation - Contract or Commitment to Participate in Amateur and Professional Athletics, 11/16/05; Bylaw 12.1.1 Amateur Status; Bylaw 12.2.5 Contracts and Compensation)

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Question: Head Baseball Coach at College USA would like to schedule the following out of season activities for his team this week:
Monday - Skill Instruction 1 hour
Tuesday - Weights 1 hour
Wednesday - Weights and Running 2 hours
Thursday - Skill Instruction 1 hour
Friday - Weights 1 hour
Saturday - Weights and Running 2 hours
Sunday - off
Is this a permissible schedule?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 17.1.5.5 states that outside the playing season during the academic year, all countable athletically related activities (per Bylaw 17.02.1) are prohibited during two calendar days per week.

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Question: Donna is a prospect who is interested in joining the swim team at State next fall and would like to major in industrial engineering. A prominent State alum, someone with an esteemed career in this industry, decides to write Donna a letter telling her how great the industrial engineering program is and what an honor it is to be a student-athlete at State. Is this permissible?

Answer: No
All in-person, on- and off-campus recruiting contacts with a prospect or the prospect's relatives/legal guardians shall be made only by authorized institutional staff members. Such contact, as well as correspondence and telephone calls, by representatives of an institution's athletics interests (including alums) is prohibited. (NCAA Bylaw 13.1.2.1)

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Question: Long Jump is a student-athlete on the track team at Institution A. During her season she was invited to appear on a local sports TV show for an interview. The interview is part of Institution A's conference-sponsored media day. The interview was to take part during the day and Long Jump would be missing one class. Is it permissible for Long Jump to attend the interview?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Bylaw 12.5.3 states, (a) During the Playing Season. During the playing season, a student-athlete may appear on radio and television programs (e.g., coaches shows) or engage in writing projects when the student-athlete's appearance or participation is related in any way to athletics ability or prestige, provided the student-athlete does not receive any remuneration for the appearance or participation in the activity. The student-athlete shall not make any endorsement, expressed or implied, of any commercial product or service. The student-athlete may, however, receive actual and necessary expenses directly related to the appearance or participation in the activity. A student-athlete participating in media activities during the playing season may not miss class, except for class time missed in conjunction with away-from-home competition or to participate in a conference-sponsored media day. (Revised: 1/16/93, 1/14/97, 1/9/06, 4/27/06)

(b) Outside the Playing Season. Outside the playing season, a student-athlete may participate in media activities (e.g., appearance on radio, television, in films or stage productions or participation in writing projects) when such appearance or participation is related in any way to athletics ability or prestige, provided the student-athlete is eligible academically to represent the institution and does not receive any remuneration for such appearance or participation. The student-athlete may not make any endorsement, expressed or implied, of any commercial product or service. The student-athlete may, however, receive legitimate and normal expenses directly related to such appearance or participation, provided the source of the expenses is the entity sponsoring the activity. (Revised: 1/16/93, 1/14/97)

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Question: Ace, a student-athlete at University X, competes in an open swim meet at another institution. Representing himself, Ace paid his own expenses, did not score points for University X and wore his own apparel. He did receive care from the host institution's athletic trainer and coaching from his coach at University X, who were both at the meet. Did Ace use a season of competition?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Bylaw 13.7.3 states, An institution may not arrange miscellaneous, personalized recruiting aids (e.g., personalized jerseys, personalized audio/visual scoreboard presentations) and may not permit a prospective student-athlete to engage in any game-day simulations (e.g., running onto the field with the team during pregame introductions) during an unofficial visit. Personalized recruiting aids include any decorative items and special additions to any location the prospective student-athlete will visit (e.g., hotel room, locker room, coach's office, conference room, arena) regardless of whether or not the items include the prospective student-athlete's name or picture. (Adopted: 8/5/04; Revised: 5/14/05, 4/27/06)

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Question: Field Goal, a football prospect, took an unofficial visit to Big University. Prior to every game, the football team takes part in the ceremonial march from the parking lot to the stadium. Field Goal was asked to take part in the pre-game ritual. Is it permissible for him to do so?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 13.7.3 states, An institution may not arrange miscellaneous, personalized recruiting aids (e.g., personalized jerseys, personalized audio/visual scoreboard presentations) and may not permit a prospective student-athlete to engage in any game-day simulations (e.g., running onto the field with the team during pregame introductions) during an unofficial visit. Personalized recruiting aids include any decorative items and special additions to any location the prospective student-athlete will visit (e.g., hotel room, locker room, coach's office, conference room, arena) regardless of whether or not the items include the prospective student-athlete's name or picture. (Adopted: 8/5/04; Revised: 5/14/05, 4/27/06)

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Question: A prospect graduated from high school in June 2006. She used all five permissible official visits during her senior year in high school, but she did not enroll in college in the fall of 2006. Can an institution's coach offer her an official visit in the fall of 2006?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Bylaw 13.6.2.3 states that the one-visit limitation and the limitations on total official visits (see Bylaw 13.6.2.2) apply separately to A) the period in which the prospect is in high school, and B) to the period beginning October 15 following the prospect's completion of high school. This essentially means that a prospect can be provided a maximum of 10 official visits - 5 while in high school and 5 for the period beginning October 15 following completion of high school. A prospect does not have to graduate from high school in order to receive a permissible post-high school visit.

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Question: Slam Dunk, a men's basketball PSA, took an official visit at Big Time University. Slam Dunk called the Head Coach a week later to thank him for the visit. When the call was made, the Head Coach was out of the office and a message was left. The message was received by the director of operations. Is it permissible for the director operations to call Slam Dunk back on the behalf of the Coach?

Answer: No
NCAA Bylaw 11.7.1.2 states, all recruiting coordination functions (except routine clerical tasks) must be performed by the head coach or one or more of the assistant coaches who count toward the numerical limitations in Bylaw 11.7.4. Such functions include: (Revised: 4/27/06 effective 8/1/06)
(a) Activities involving athletics evaluation and/or selection of prospects.
(b) Telephone calls to prospective student-athletes (or prospective student-athletes' parents, legal guardians or coaches).
(c) Preparation of general recruiting correspondence to prospective student-athletes (or prospective student-athletes' parents or legal guardians).

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Question: The men's soccer team at University X will be participating in a read-a-thon with elementary school children. The coach would like the student-athletes to wear University X apparel during the event. Is it permissible for University X to provide shirts to student-athletes for this event?

Answer: Yes
NCAA Bylaw 16.8.1.9 allows an institution to provide a student-athlete with one shirt (e.g., polo, oxford style) bearing the institution's logo to be used for team travel or other events in which he or she is representing the institution. Also, the shirt may bear a single manufacturer's or distributor's normal trademark or logo not to exceed 2 1/4 square inches in area, including any additional materials surrounding the normal trademark or logo.

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Question: An institution's basketball coach would like to have his student-athletes participate in skill instruction starting on the first day of classes. Is this permissible?

Answer: Yes
For sports other than football, participation in skill instruction is permissible outside the declared playing season from the first day of the fall term to one week prior to the final exam period. From September 15 to April 15, more than four student-athletes from the same team may be involved in skill instruction with their coaches. Outside these dates, no more than four can be involved at any one time in any facility. (Bylaw 17.1.5.2.2, Skill Instruction - Sports Other Than Football)

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Question: Several athletes from an institution's swimming team enter a fantasy football league, one that costs $5 to sign up for and awards a $500 grand prize to the winner at season's end. Have they engaged in gambling activities?

Answer: Yes
They violated Bylaw 10.3 Gambling Activities, which prohibits institutional staff members and student-athletes from participating in any gambling activity involving intercollegiate or professional sports. In the case of fantasy football, the sign-up fee and/or awarding of a prize caused it to be classified as gambling.

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Question: Three members of the men's basketball coaching staff are engaging in off-campus recruiting activities. During this time, can an additional coach leave campus to engage in contact or evaluation of prospects?

Answer: Yes
Although no more than three coaches can simultaneously engage in off-campus recruiting activities, an additional coach can leave campus to recruit before another coach arrives back on campus. (Bylaw 11.7.5, Men's Basketball - Contact and Evaluation of Prospects Off-Campus)

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Question: Which of the following materials are considered permissible attachments to general correspondence sent to prospects?

A. Custom-made recruiting brochure
B. Black-and-White copy of a Sports Illustrated article about program
C. "Wanted" poster with prospect's name and picture on it
D. Sport-specific questionnaire

Answer: B, D.
Attachments to general correspondence may only include items that are not created for recruiting purposes, except for those specifically permitted as printed recruiting material (such as the questionnaire). Bylaw 13.4.1 Recruiting Materials, 12/13/05 Official Interpretation, Item #3

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Question: Before an official visit can be made, what materials must a prospect provide to the institution?

Answer: The prospect must provide an official test score (PSAT, SAT, PLAN or ACT) and an academic transcript from their applicable high school/college. (Bylaws 13.6.2.2.2.1, 13.6.2.2.2.2)

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Question: A student-athlete transfers from one four-year institution to another and begins his full-time studies during the 2006 summer term. When will he be eligible for intercollegiate competition? (Assume he is enrolled full-time in following semesters)

A. After the Fall 2006 semester
B. After the Spring 2007 semester
C. Beginning of Fall 2007 semester
D. Exactly one calendar year after initial enrollment

Answer: C
The NCAA stipulates that transfer athletes from four-year institutions are not eligible until they complete a residence requirement of one full academic year (two full semesters or three full quarters). Summer terms cannot be used to satisfy this requirement. (Bylaws 14.5.1, 14.5.1.1, 14.5.1.1.1)

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Question: Which of the following is NOT required of incoming student-athletes in order to obtain "qualifier" status?

A. Specified minimum SAT or ACT score
B. Successful completion of required core curriculum
C. Specified minimum GPA in the core curriculum
D. Graduation from an NCAA-certified high school

Answer: All of the above clauses are required by the NCAA in order to earn qualifer status (Bylaws 14.02.9.1 and 14.3.1.1)

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Question: During the summer term, how many hours per week may student-athletes participate in countable athletically related activities? (Assume it is outside the playing season)

A. 8
B. 15
C. Zero
D. 6

Answer: C.
- Under Bylaw 17.1.5.2.1.1, student-athletes may not participate in any countable athletically related activities outside the playing season during any institutional vacation period and/or summer. Workouts designed and conducted by a strength and conditioning coach are permissable under the following conditions:
a) The coach is not countable; he/she performs such duties on a department-wide basis.
b) Workouts are voluntary and conducted at the request of the student-athlete.

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Question: A student-athlete successfully completes 15 credits during her first year of enrollment (fall and spring semester). Over the summer term, she completes 9 more. Is she eligibile for competition when her second year of school begins?

A. Yes
B. No

Answer: No.
- During the first year of enrollment, a student-athlete must complete 18 or more credit hours over the traditional fall/spring semester period. Satisfactory completion of at least 24 credit hours is also required prior to the second year of enrollment (summer hours are countable here). NCAA Bylaw 14.4.3.1

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Question: On what date may currently enrolled student-athletes begin receiving telephone calls from prospects? (Assume the student-athlete's participation is not at the direction of a coach or booster and such telephone calls are financed by the prospect.)

A. April 1 of the prospect's junior year of high school.
B. June 15 following the completion of the prospect's junior year of high school.
C. July 1 following the completion of the prospect's junior year of high school.
D. January 1 of the prospect's senior year of high school.

Answer: C
- July 1 following the completion of the prospect's junior year of high school. (NCAA Bylaw 13.1.3.5.2)

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Question: A head diving coach at an institution wants to evaluate a 7th grader next week during the late National Letter of Intent Signing Period. Can the coach evaluate the 7th grader, during a dead period, since he is not of prospect age yet?

A. Yes
B. No

Answer: No.
- NCAA Official Interpretation [3.2.06] states that evaluations of students not yet in the ninth grade must occur during a contact/evaluation period.

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Question: Since Institution A's women's basketball team is hosting the first and second rounds of the WNIT tournament, several local recruits would like to come and cheer on the team. Can Institution A provide complimentary admissions to recruits to attend the WNIT tournament?

A. True
B. False

Answer: No.
- NCAA Bylaws 13.6.6.2.2 & 13.7.2.4 state that provision of complimentary or reduced-cost admissions to prospects for an NCAA championship (all rounds) or other postseason contests (e.g., bowl games, NAIA or NIT championship) constitutes excessive entertainment and is prohibited. The prospect may purchase these tickets only in the same manner as any other member of the general public.

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Question: An enrolled student-athlete is going home for the Christmas holidays and the head coach reminds the studentathlete that the athlete's former high school will be participating in a tournament. The institution is recruiting a prospect on the student-athlete's former high school team. The coach reminds the student-athlete to make sure contact is made with the prospect. This is a permissible recruiting contact.

A. True
B. False

Answer: False.
(NCAA Bylaw 13.02.5.1 (a) Permissible Recruitment Activities for Enrolled Student-Athletes)

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Question: An individual was a member of a booster support organization for the University of Louisville Cardinal Football Team and contributed money to the program in 2000, 2001, and 2003. He is no longer a member of the booster support organization and has not made contributions during the 2004 and 2005 seasons. Is he still considered a booster?

Answer: Yes, once an individual is considered a booster, and acts as an "athletic representative", that individual is always considered a booster.
(NCAA Bylaw 13.02.13 Representative of Athletics Interests)

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Question: In order for a student-athlete to be eligible for competition at the certifying institution for any regular academic term, what is the number of degree-credit hours that the student-athlete must have successfully completed in the previous term?
a. 4
b. 12
c. 6
d. Zero

Answer: 6 - A student-athlete must successfully complete a minimum of six (6) semester hours to be eligible for competition the following semester.
(NCAA Bylaw 14.4.3.1(a). Fulfillment of Credit Hour Requirements)

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Question: A student-athlete at Institution A would like to transfer and notifies the institution regarding the desire to transfer. Institution B contacts Institution A about the student-athlete's interest; however, Institution A informs B that it will not permit contact with the student-athlete to any institution. What is required of Institution A now that it has denied the student-athlete's and Institution A's request?
a. Inform the student-athlete to withdraw from Institution A.
b. No other action is necessary.
c. Inform the student-athlete of a hearing opportunity to appeal the denial of contact.
d. None of the above.

Answer: C - Inform the student-athlete of a hearing opportunity to appeal the denial of contact.
(NCAA Bylaws 13.1.1.3 Four Year College Prospects and 13.1.1.3.1 Hearing Opportunity)

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Question: Is it permissible for a student-athlete, with remaining eligibility, to participate in a sports camp, at their institution, as a demonstrator only, outside of the playing season?

Answer: No, it is not?
(NCAA Bylaw 13.12.2.1 Student-Athletes and accompanying interpretation)

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Question: A prospect who was a non-qualifier is enrolled in his first year at a two-year college. What can you do to recruit the prospect?
a. Have a contact at the two year college
b. Provide an official visit
c. Call the prospect
d. All of the above

Answer: C - You may only call the prospect.
(NCAA Bylaws 13.02.3 Contact, 13.02.6 Evaluation, and 13.02.15.1 Official Visit)

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  • Countable vs. Non-countable Athletically Related Activities

    Question: Which of the following activities are considered non-countable athletically related activities?
    A. CardsCare activities
    B. Academic meetings
    C. Meetings with a coach that are initiated by the student
    D. Recruiting activities

    Answer: All of the above (NCAA Bylaw 17.02.13 Voluntary Athletically Related Activities)

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  • Recruiting

    Question: A non-recruited basketball prospect attends a basketball contest at an institution and encounters a member of the coaching staff after the game. They have a non-sports related conversation and go their separate ways. The visit was financed by the prospect and was not prearranged. Two weeks later, a member of the coaching staff attends a basketball game at the prospects high school, initiates a sports related conversation with the prospect and invites the prospect to visit the institution.

    How many countable contacts were there? Was there an official visit?

    One, the conversation at the basketball game was not a contact because the visit was not prearranged or financed by the institution; however, the conversation at the prospects school was a contact and an evaluation.

    Answer: There was a countable contact and an evaluation; however, there was no official visit.
    (NCAA Bylaws 13.02.3 Contact, 13.02.6 Evaluation, and 13.02.15.1 Official Visit)

    Question: A prospect may take a maximum of _____ expense-paid visits to any Division I and Division II institution while in high school, with no more than one permitted per institution and regardless of whether the prospect is involved in more
    than one sport.
    A. Three
    B. Four
    C. Five
    D. Ten

    Answer: C. Five (See Bylaw 13.7.1.2)

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    Question: Which of the following methods of communication is/are not permissible?
    A. A standard U.S. Post Office postcard with a greeting from the team.
    B. A mass electronic mail letter noting the team's accomplishments.
    C. A videotaped message to the prospect placed on CD-Rom.
    D. An instant-messenger conversation.

    Answer: C - A videotaped message to the prospect placed on CD Rom.
    See Bylaws 13.02.12, 13.4.1 (a & d), and 13.4.2.1

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    Question: Can a coach hand deliver the National Letter of Intent to a prospect while on UofL's campus?

    Answer: Yes. NCAA Bylaw 13.1.6.2.1 specifically prohibits in-person, OFF-campus delivery of the National Letter of Intent. However, the NLI may be hand delivered to a prospect that is on UL's campus, provided it is not during a DEAD period, and the prospect may only sign an NLI during a permissible signing period.

  • -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Question: Cross Bar is a soccer student-athlete at Big North College. Cross graduated in the spring of 2008 but has returned this fall to play his final season. Cross is enrolled in a full-time course load this semester and all the hours can be applied toward the economics degree program. Cross, however, is categorized as an undecided student in the institution's computer system. Does Cross have to actually declare a major?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Staff Interpretation- 9/26/06- Postbaccalaureate Student-Athlete Taking Coursework toward Second Major or Degree (I/II/III)- states that a student-athlete who has graduated and is continuing as a full-time student at the same institution while taking course work that would lead to the equivalent of another major or degree as defined and documented by the institution is not required to officially declare or designate another major or degree. The student-athlete must be enrolled in course work that is acceptable toward any of the institution's other majors or degrees. [Reference: NCAA Divisions I, II, and III Bylaw 14.1.9 (graduate student/postbaccalaureate participation).]

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    Question: It is permissible for a director of operations (or other non-coaching staff member with sport-specific responsibilities) to attend a local athletics event involving prospective student-athletes and have recruiting conversations with the prospective student-athlete's relatives or legal guardians who are attending the event. True or False?

    Answer: The answer is False.
    NCAA Bylaw 13.1.2.1 states that all in-person, on- and off-campus recruiting contacts with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete's relatives or legal guardian(s) shall be made only by authorized institutional staff members. Such contact, as well as correspondence and telephone calls, by representatives of an institution's athletics interests is prohibited except as otherwise permitted in this section. Violations of this bylaw involving individuals other than a representative of an institution's athletics interests shall be considered institutional violations per Constitution 2.8.1; however, such violations shall not affect the prospective student-athlete's eligibility. (Revised: 8/5/04)

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    Question: The baseball coaches at College USA would like to provide several prospective student-athletes with complimentary admissions to attend a home game on saturday. The game is being played at a ballpark that is not their regular home facility. Can the coaches have contact with these prospective student-athletes after the game?

    Answer: If the contest takes place outside of a contact period, it would NOT be permissible to have contact with the prospective student-athletes. If it is during a contact period, the coaches may have contact with these prospective student-athletes per NCAA Bylaw 13.1.1.1. Any contact that takes place during a contact period must count as an off-campus contact.

    13.7.2.2 Home Games at Site Other than Regular Home Facility
    If an institution schedules any regular-season home games at a site not designated as its regular home facility, the host institution may provide a maximum of three complimentary admissions to any such game for the exclusive use of a prospective student-athlete and those persons accompanying the prospective student-athlete. Tournament and postseason games are excluded. The institution shall not arrange or permit any other entertainment or payment of expenses, including transportation, except as permitted in Bylaw 13.5.3. (Revised: 4/24/03)

    Contact with Prospective Student-Athletes at Home Contest at a Site Other than Regular Home Facility (I)

    Interpretation: The committee confirmed that it is not permissible for institutional staff members to have recruiting contact outside a contact period with prospective student-athletes who receive complimentary admissions to a home contest conducted at a site other than the institution's home facility. Any permissible contact during a contact period must be counted as an off-campus contact.

    [References: Division I Bylaws 13.01.3 (off-campus recruiting), 13.02.4.1 (contact period), 13.1.4 (recruiting calendars), 13.7.2.2 (home games at site other than regular home facility), an official interpretation (4/28/94, Item No. 4), and staff interpretation (12/12/07, Item No. 1), which has been archived]

    13.1.1.1 High School Prospective Student-Athletes.
    Off-campus recruiting contacts shall not be made with a prospective student-athlete or the prospective student-athlete's relatives or legal guardians before July 1 following the prospective student-athlete's completion of the junior year in high school (July 15 in women's gymnastics). U.S. service academy exceptions to this provision are set forth in Bylaw 13.16.1. (Revised: 1/10/91 effective 7/1/91, 1/11/94 effective 3/15/94, 1/10/95, 1/14/97 effective 5/1/97, 10/28/97, 4/26/01 effective 8/1/01, 4/29/04 effective 8/1/04, 4/28/05, 1/9/06, 2/26/07)

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    Question: Strike Out is a baseball student-athlete at College USA. Strike played in his first game of the season last Saturday. Stirke had pitched a few innings when the game was called on account of lightening. Since the game was not complete, does Strike utilize a season of competition?

    Answer: Yes
    NCAA Staff Interpretation - 11/18/87 - Use of Season of competition when event is not completed - states that student-athletes would be charged with a season of competition for any event (including scrimmages) in which they started participation; regardless of whether they finish (i.e., discontinued game due to inclement weather, contestant drops out of event) that particular event or contest. Determined that the student-athlete would be charged with a season of competition regardless of whether that individual's performance was included in the final scoring of the event.

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    Question: Pooch Kick is a football prospective student-athlete who will be initially enrolling at College USA in the fall. Pooch really wants to be prepared for preseason camp, so he decides to start practicing on his own. In order to get used to College USA's equipment, Pooch asks the coaching staff if he can purchase a few balls and tees. College USA will be having a public sale at the end of April. Can Pooch purchase balls and tees at this public sale?

    Answer: Yes
    NCAA Educational Column- 3/18/04- Equipment and Apparel to Enrolled Student-Athletes and Prospects (I)- states that a student-athlete may retain athletics apparel items (not equipment) at the end of the individual's collegiate participation.

    Used equipment may be purchased by the student-athlete on the same cost basis as by any other individual interested in purchasing such equipment and may be offered to student-athletes before other interested parties are aware of the opportunity to purchase the equipment.

    Further, it is not permissible to sell equipment to prospective student-athletes unless the sale of equipment is made available to the general public. The sale of equipment must be publicized to the public generally and made available to all individuals on the same terms and conditions. [References: NCAA Division I Bylaws 13.2 (offers and inducements); 16.02.3 (extra benefit); 16.12.1.6 (Retention of Athletics Apparel and Equipment); an October 21, 1993 official interpretation (item reference: 1); and an October 23, 1986, official interpretation (item reference: p)].

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    Question: With this week commencing NCAA postseason basketball tournaments, all institutional/conference staff members (including full-time, part-time, and student workers) are reminded that it is not permissible to engage in any gambling activity that involves intercollegiate athletics or professional athletics, through the internet, a bookmaker, a parlay card, or any other method employed by organized gambling.

    This prohibition also includes participation in NCAA/NIT Tournament Bracket sheets in which an entry fee is required and money or any item of tangible value may be won. Previous NCAA major infractions cases involving staff members' participation in organized gambling activities have resulted in a number of institutional corrective actions, including termination of employment.

    For more information concerning sports wagering, please visit the NCAA's interactive sports wagering website at www.dontbetonit.org.

    NCAA Bylaw 10.02.1 Sports Wagering
    Sports wagering includes placing, accepting or soliciting a wager (on a staff member's or student-athlete's own behalf or on the behalf of others) of any type with any individual or organization on any intercollegiate, amateur or professional team or contest. Examples of sports wagering include, but are not limited to, the use of a bookmaker or parlay card; Internet sports wagering; auctions in which bids are placed on teams, individuals or contests; and pools or fantasy leagues in which an entry fee is required and there is an opportunity to win a prize. (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

    NCAA Bylaw 10.02.2 Wager
    A wager is any agreement in which an individual or entity agrees to give up an item of value (e.g., cash, shirt, dinner) in exchange for the possibility of gaining another item of value. (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

    NCAA Bylaw 10.3 Sports Wagering Activities
    The following individuals shall not knowingly participate in sports wagering activities or provide information to individuals involved in or associated with any type of sports wagering activities concerning intercollegiate, amateur or professional athletics competition: (Adopted: 4/26/07 effective 8/1/07)

    (a) Staff members of an institution's athletics department;
    (b) Non-athletics department staff members who have responsibilities within or over the athletics department (e.g., chancellor or president, faculty athletics representative, individual to whom athletics reports);
    (c) Staff members of a conference office; and
    (d) Student-athletes.

    Answer: Don't Bet On It!

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    Question: During the summer vacation period, a student-athlete voluntarily asks to meet with the head coach regarding goals for the upcoming academic year. Is this permissible?

    Answer: Yes
    NCAA Official Interpretation- 10/8/87- Voluntary consultation with coach not considered 'practice activity'- states that it is permissible for an individual student-athlete to consult voluntarily with his or her coach outside the established playing season, provided the student-athlete and coach do not engage in actual drills or other physical aspects of practice activities. The coach is not permitted to request to see a particular student-athlete for this purpose, however.

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    Question: Ground Ball is a baseball student-athlete at College USA. At the beginning of the season, Ground was issued a pair of tennis shoes. Because Ground was still using a pair of shoes from last year, he only wore the new pair 2-3 times. At the end of the season a friend of Ground's asked if he could buy the shoes, and Ground sold them for $50.00. Since Ground was allowed to keep his shoes at the end of the season, was it permissible for him to sell them and keep the money?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Educational Column- 8/18/03- 2003 Column No. 17 - Division I Bylaws 12.1.1, 12.5.2.1 and 16.1.2.2.1 - Student-Athletes Selling Items Received for Participation in Intercollegiate Athletics- states that pursuant to Bylaws 12.1.1, 12.5.2.1 and 16.12.2.1, it is impermissible for a student-athlete to sell any item received for intercollegiate athletics participation or exchange or assign such an item for another item of value, even if the student-athlete's name or picture does not appear on the item received for intercollegiate athletics participation. Therefore, a student-athlete is not permitted to sell awards received for participation, conference or national championships or special achievements per Bylaw 16.1.4.

    The above fact pattern is an actual violation from the 2006-07 academic year. The student-athlete was declared ineligible and needed to have his eligibility reinstated by the NCAA.

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    Question: The men's soccer coaches at College USA want to make sure their student-athletes stay in great shape during the summer while they are at home. The coaches have worked with the strength and conditioning coaches to create suggested work out programs for the student-athletes to take home with them. The coaches really want to make sure the student-athletes are following these programs, so they have also provided the student-athletes with forms to log their conditioning activities. The coaches would like to see these reports on a weekly basis, so they will provide them with pre-paid postage envelopes to mail the reports back to the coaches. Is it permissible for the coaches to provide such envelopes to the student-athletes?

    Answer: No
    Although the coaches are permitted to provide work out information to student-athletes during the summer, NCAA Official Interpretation-10/21/93- Monitoring of voluntary workout programs- states that outside an institution's playing season (including the summer), it is not permissible for the institution to require a student-athlete to report information related to his or her voluntary workout program or to provide any expenses (e.g., postage costs, cost of collect calls) for the purpose of reporting the progress of the voluntary workout program. [References: 16.02.3 (extra benefit), 17.02.1.1-(a) (countable athletically related activities), 17.02.1.2-(m) (non-countable athletically related activities) and 17.02.12 (practice)]

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    Question: Cent R. Line is a prospective student-athlete that signed a National Letter of Intent (NLI) with Eastern College to play volleyball next year. Cent has also been approached by the basketball coaches about practicing with the team after the volleyball season is over. If Cent practices with the basketball team, does her scholarship still count against the volleyball team limits?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Bylaw 15.5.8.2 states that a counter who practices or competes in basketball and one or more other sports (other than football) shall be a counter in basketball.

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    Question: First N. Goal is a prospective student-athlete who is going to sign a National Letter of Intent on Wednesday to play football at Western College. The Head Coach at Western College would like to invite First's parents to the press conference announcing the incoming recruiting class. Is this permissible?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Bylaw 13.10.9.2 states that an institution may make an announcement on the institution's campus for the sole purpose of presenting at one time to the media the names of all prospective student-athletes who have signed a National Letter of Intent or accepted written offers of admission and/or financial aid from that institution, with the understanding that no prospective student-athletes (or their friends or relatives) may be in attendance.

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    Question: Full Twist is a diving prospective student-athlete that signed a National Letter of Intent (NLI) with State College in November. Full still needs to submit a few documents to complete her admissions and housing applications for fall 2008 enrollment. The coaches would like to send Full a text message to remind her of these important deadlines. Is it permissible for the coaches at State College to send Full text messages?

    Answer: Yes
    With the adoption of NCAA Proposal 207-47, coaches are permitted to send text messages to prospective student-athletes that have signed NLIs with their institutions. Please note that this piece of legislation has an immediate effective date.

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    Question: The men's and women's track and field teams at College America are competing in the Winter Invitational this weekend. The invitational is an open meet, so not all participants will be collegiate student-athletes. A few of the participants will be prospective student-athletes that the coaches at College America are recruiting. Will the coaches at College America use evaluations when watching these prospective student-athletes compete against their student-athletes?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Bylaw 13.1.8.16 states that an institution does not use an evaluation if the institution's team competes in an open meet (e.g., track and field meet) in which prospective student-athletes also compete. (Adopted: 1/10/92)

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    Question: The men's basketball coaches at Eastern College are recruiting And One, a prospect on the west coast. The coaches were only able to watch And in person a few times, so they contact his high school and ask to purchase game film for the entire season. The high school normally charges $100 for the videos. The cost includes blank DVDS, postage and a fee for the service provided. Is it permissible for Eastern College to purchase the game film at this cost?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Official Interpretation- 11/7/07- Purchase of Video from a Prospective Student-Athlete's Educational Institution (I)- states that the committee confirmed that it is not permissible for an institution to purchase film or video (e.g., game film that includes prospective student-athletes) from a prospective student-athlete's educational institution at a cost that exceeds the value of a blank videotape or DVD (or other medium) and the cost of postage to receive the video. [References: Division I Bylaws 13.14.3.1 (published recruiting services), 13.14.3.2 (video services) and 13.15.1 (prohibited expenses)]

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    Question: Point Guard is a basketball student-athlete that transferred to State College in January 2007. Point served his residency requirement during the spring 2007 and fall 2007 semesters, and he has been certified as eligible to compete. The fall semester officially ends on Friday, December 14th. The basketball team will be competing on Saturday, December 15th. The team will be leaving campus on Thursday, December 13th to travel to the game. Can Point travel with the team since they are leaving prior to the conclusion of the fall 2007 semester?

    Answer: Yes
    NCAA Staff Interpretation- 12/17/97- Student-Athlete Receiving Travel Expenses When Serving Residence Requirement- states that the NCAA staff has confirmed that a transfer student-athlete who is serving a residence requirement may receive travel expenses prior to the conclusion of the term to attend a competition that occurs after the date of the last scheduled examination listed in the institution's official calendar for that term, provided the institution can certify that the student-athlete will fulfill the obligations of the residence requirement during that trip, and the student-athlete does not represent the institution in competition until the day after the date of the last scheduled examination. [References: NCAA Bylaws 14.1.8 (change in eligibility status); 16.8.1.2 (competition while representing institution); and Official interpretation, 11/19/92, item 4]

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    Question: On the initial day of the early signing period for the National Letter of Intent (NLI), the men's basketball program at College USA released the names of the prospective student-athletes that signed with their institution. The men's basketball program subsequently signs an additional prospective student-athlete during the spring signing period. The sports information office would like to update the biographies of the prospects who signed during the fall period, as during the interim two of the signees were named all-state and another won the state basketball championship. Is it permissible for the institution to release additional information about NLI signees?

    Answer: Yes
    NCAA Bylaw 13.10.9 states that publicity released by an institution concerning a prospective student-athlete's commitment to attend the institution shall occur only after the prospective student-athlete has signed a National Letter of Intent or after the prospective student-athlete's signed acceptance of the institution's written offer of admission and/or financial aid. Such communications (with no limit on number or content) may be released to media outlets at the institution's discretion except as limited by Bylaw 13.10.9.2. However, an institution is prohibited from purchasing or receiving commercial advertising (e.g., print, media or billboard) to be used to identify a prospective student-athlete by name or picture. Violations of this bylaw do not affect a prospective student-athlete's eligibility and are considered institutional violations per Constitution 2.8.1. (Revised: 1/14/97, 4/29/04 effective 8/1/04, 8/25/04)

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    Question: The Head Volleyball Coach at Western College arranges for an off-campus contact with Outside Hitter, a prospective student-athlete, on Monday, November 19th. Outside has not signed an NLI during the early signing period, and the coach hopes to be able to convince her to sign with Western College before the deadline expires on November 21st. The coach brings the NLI to Outside's home and presents it to her in an effort to secure a signature. Is this permissible?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Bylaw 13.1.6.7.1 states that in-person; off-campus delivery of a letter of intent by an institutional staff member is prohibited. The letter may be delivered by express mail, courier service, regular mail, electronic mail or facsimile machine.

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    Question: Red Flag is a prospective student-athlete that will be initially enrolling full-time at a collegiate institution in January 2008. Red completed 14 core courses, earned the minimum GPA/test score combination and will graduate in December. One of Red's 14 core courses was earned through credit-by-examination. Can Red use this course to meet NCAA initial eligibility requirements?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Staff Interpretation- [10/24/07]- Use of Credit-by-Examination to Satisfy Minimum Initial-Eligibility Core-Curriculum Requirements (I/II)- states that membership services staff confirmed that credit earned only by examination shall not be used to satisfy the requirement of completing the minimum core curriculum for initial-eligibility purposes.

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    Question: Big State University was approached by a local high school to participate in their annual fundraiser. The money raised will be used to buy equipment and uniforms for the athletic department. The high school requested a BSU t-shirt and hat and asked if BSU's conference office could also donate a t-shirt and hat.

    Is it permissible for BSU to provide items for the high school's fundraiser? Is it permissible for BSU's conference office to provide items for the high school's fundraiser?

    Answer: No to both questions
    NCAA Bylaw 13.15.1.2 states that an institution may not provide funding, directly or indirectly or through paid advertisements, to benefit a high school athletics program. Violations of this bylaw do not affect a prospective student-athlete's eligibility and are considered institutional violations per Constitution 2.8.1

    Although NCAA Bylaw 13.15.1.2 does not specifically identify conference offices in the prohibition of participating in high school fundraisers, it is not permissible because conference offices are required to adhere to the same rules and regulations as their member institutions.

    Constitution, Article 3.3.4.1, states that member conferences of this Association agree to administer their athletics programs in accordance with the constitution, bylaws and other legislation of the Association.

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    Question: Pen L. Tee is a soccer student-athlete from England. Prior to enrolling at Big State University, Pen played for a club team in his home town. The club team only provided Pen with actual and necessary expenses during the season, but a few of the players were provided a salary. Did Pen play on a professional team?

    Answer: Yes
    NCAA Bylaw 12.02.4 states that a professional team is any organized team that:

    (a) Provides any of its players more than actual and necessary expenses for participation on the team, except as otherwise permitted by NCAA legislation. Actual and necessary expenses are limited to the following, provided the value of these items is commensurate with the fair market value in the locality of the player(s) and is not excessive in nature: (Revised: 4/25/02 effective 8/1/02)

    (1) Meals directly tied to competition and practice held in preparation for such competition;
    (2) Lodging directly tied to competition and practice held in preparation for such competition;
    (3) Apparel, equipment and supplies;
    (4) Coaching and instruction;
    (5) Health/medical insurance;
    (6) Transportation (expenses to and from practice competition, cost of transportation from home to training/practice site at the beginning of the season and from training/practice site to home at the end ofseason);
    (7) Medical treatment and physical therapy;
    (8) Facility usage; (Revised: 4/24/03)
    (9) Entry fees; and (Revised: 4/24/03)
    (10) Other reasonable expenses; or (Adopted: 4/24/03; Revised: 10/28/04)

    (b) Declares itself to be professional (see Bylaw 12.1.2.4.1.1). (Revised: 8/8/02)

    In situations like this, the institution will need to work with the NCAA Eligibility Center and/or the NCAA Reinstatement staff to determine the student-athlete's eligibility for intercollegiate sports.

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    Question: Switch Hitter is a softball student-athlete at State College. Switch is interested in providing pitching lessons to earn extra money during the off-season. Can Switch use State College's facilities when providing these lessons?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Bylaw 12.4.2.1 states that a student-athlete may receive compensation for teaching or coaching sport skills or techniques in his/her sport on a fee-for-lesson bases, provided:
    1. institutional facilities are not used;
    2. playing lessons shall not be permitted
    3. the institution obtains and keeps on file documentation of the recipient of the lesson(s) and the fee for the lesson(s) provided during any time of year; and
    4. the compensation is paid by the lesson recipient (or the recipient's family) and not another individual or entity
    5. instruction to each individual is comparable to the instruction that would be provided during a private lesson when the instruction involves more than one individual at a time
    6. the student-athlete does not use his/her name, picture or appearance to promote or advertise the availability of fee-for-lesson sessions.

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    Question: Big State College men's basketball team is getting ready for their first official on-court practice on Friday, October 12th. They are going to practice from 7 pm - 8 pm and then have "midnight madness" with the women's team from 8 pm to 9 pm. If the team has not yet used their permissible 2 hours of individual skill-related instruction for the week that includes Oct. 12th, can they participate in individual skill-related instruction earlier in the day on the 12th (2 pm - 4 pm) while also still participating in practice at 7 pm?

    Answer: Yes
    As long as the team does not exceed 4 hours of countable athletically related activities on 10/12/07, and they have the 2 hours of individual skill-related instruction remaining, it would be permissible to participate in individual skill-related instruction from 2 pm - 4 pm and then practice from 7 pm - 9 pm.

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    Question: Walk Off, Hr. is a freshman student at Big Time University. Walk decides to try out for the baseball team during the second week of classes. Walk makes the team and is told that he has to finish his registration with the NCAA Eligibility Center. Because Walk had already started classes at Big Time University, he asked the admissions office to send his SAT score to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Is that permissible?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Bylaw 14.3.1.3.4 states that the minimum SAT or ACT score(s) used for initial-eligibility purposes must be provided to the NCAA Eligibility Center by the appropriate testing agency through an official test-score report. This bylaw became effective 8/1/07 for those student-athletes first entering a collegiate institution on or after 8/1/07.

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    Question: Three N. Out, a senior prospective student-athlete, is being recruited by College USA in the sports of football and track. With the dead period for football occurring the week of the National Letter of Intent, would it be permissible for the track coaches to contact three off-campus during the football dead period?

    Answer: Yes
    An 11/21/91 NCAA Official Interpretation states that the dead period for recruiting purposes is sport applicable. Therefore, a multi-sport prospect that is being earnestly recruited in more than one sport could be recruited on- or off-campus during a permissible recruiting period even if a recruiting dead period is applicable in another sport in which the prospect is being recruited.

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    Question: Kris Kringle, Head Women's Basketball Coach at Big Time University, wants to buy and send Christmas cards to her 8 NLI signees. Is this permissible?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Bylaw 13.4.1.1 does not include greeting cards. A coach, however, could send an institutional note card wishing him/her a Merry Christmas. 13.4.1.1 Printed Recruiting Materials.

    As specified below, an institution may provide the following printed materials to prospective student-athletes, coaches of prospective student-athletes or any other individual responsible for teaching or directing an activity in which a prospective student-athlete is involved: (Adopted: 4/28/05 effective 8/1/05 for publications prepared for the 2005-06 academic year and after)

    (a) General Correspondence. General correspondence, including letters and postcards issued by the U.S. postal service (i.e., blank cards) and institutional note cards may be sent to a prospective student-athlete only by mail. Attachments to general correspondence may include materials printed on plain white paper with black ink. The content of all general recruiting correspondence to prospective student-athletes (or prospective student-athletes' parents or legal guardians) must be prepared by the head coach or one of the assistant coaches who count toward the numerical limitations in Bylaw 11.7.4 (see Bylaw 11.7.1.2). It is not permissible for an institution's president or chancellor or director of athletics to prepare general correspondence to prospective student-athletes. (Revised: 3/8/06)

    (b) Business Cards.

    (c) Camp Brochures. Camp brochures may be provided to a prospective student-athlete. Brochures are not restricted by content or design, but are restricted to a single two-sided sheet, not to exceed 17" X 22" when opened in full. (Note: These brochures may be provided to a prospective student-athlete prior to September 1 at the beginning of the prospective student-athlete's junior year in high school.) (See also Bylaw 12.5.1.7).

    (d) Questionnaires. An institution may provide questionnaires to a prospective student-athlete prior to September 1 at the beginning of the prospective student-athlete's junior year in high school.

    (e) Nonathletics Institutional Publications. An institution may provide nonathletics institutional publications available to all students at any time (e.g., official academic, admissions and student-services publications published by the institution and available to all students).

    (f) NCAA Educational Material Published by the NCAA (e.g., NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete). (Note: This information may be provided to a prospective student-athlete prior to September 1 at the beginning of the prospective student-athlete's junior year in high school.)

    (g) Athletics Publications. An institution may produce a recruiting brochure or media guide (but not both) and provide the publication to a prospective student-athlete. The publications may have only one color printing inside the cover and may not exceeding 8 1/2 by 11 inches in size and 208 pages in length. An institution may not produce a separate media guide that is intended to supplement the one permissible recruiting brochure or media guide. Such supplemental information (e.g., historical information, records) may be posted on the institution's Web site and may be printed in black and white, and provided to the media. An institution may not create a portfolio of information (e.g., pictures) to be shown to prospective student-athletes during the recruiting process unless it is considered the institution's one permissible athletics recruiting publications. An institution may produce additional media publications for separate purposes (e.g., postseason media guide, spring football practice guide), provided the additional publications are not provided to prospective student-athletes. (Revised: 3/23/05, 4/28/05, 5/12/05)

    (h) Game Programs. Game programs (which may not include posters) may be provided to prospective student-athletes only during official and unofficial recruiting visits and may not be mailed.

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    Question: Now that his institution has accepted a bowl invitation, a football student-athlete would like to make sure his family gets a hotel room for the game. Because the institution will be purchasing a large number of rooms, the hotel is offering a special rate to all persons associated with the institution. Is it permissible for the institution to provide this special rate information to the player's family?

    Answer: Yes
    An institution may reserve or secure lodging at any post-season event (other than a conference event) at a reduced or special rate for the parents/legal guardians and immediate family of a participating student-athlete. It is not permissible for the institution to cover any portion of the cost of lodging, including any costs associated with reserving or securing lodging.

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    Question: Big Time University has a game this weekend at 1:00pm. The student-athletes will be provided breakfast and a lunch (pre-game meal) at the team hotel. The coaches would like to give the student-athletes $20 cash for dinner and a snack after the competition. Is it permissible for the coaches to provide the players with $20 cash for a post-game dinner and snack?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Official Interpretation- Cash in Lieu of Meals in Conjunction with Home Competition (I) [9/27/06] states, that it is not permissible to provide cash to student-athletes in lieu of discretionary meals (except for $10 in lieu of a meal following the competition) in conjunction with a home athletics contest. Further, the committee determined that following a home competition, regardless of the timing in which student-athletes are released by the appropriate institutional authority, an institution may provide only one meal (or snack) or $10 in lieu of that meal (or snack). [Reference: NCAA Division I Bylaw 16.5.2-(d)-(2)]

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    Question: First Down, a football student-athlete, wants to transfer from College USA. He asks his coach for permission to speak to other schools. The Coach tells First Down that he can be contacted by other schools at the end of the fall semester. Is First Down entitled to a hearing, since permission to speak was not granted until the end of the semester?

    Answer: Yes
    NCAA Staff Interpretation (2/22/06)- Hearing Opportunity When Written Permission to Contact Four-Year College Prospect is Delayed (I/II/III) states: The membership services staff confirmed that if an institution delays a response to a student-athlete's request for permission to contact any other four-year institution or indicates that permission will be granted at a later date (e.g., at the end of the term), the institution must inform the student-athlete in writing within a reasonable time period following the initial request that he or she, on request, will be provided a hearing.

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    Question: Big Time University football team has a home game this weekend at 7:00pm. The student-athletes will be provided breakfast and a lunch (pre-game meal) at the team hotel. The coaches would like to give the student-athletes money for dinner and a snack after the competition. Is this permissible?

    Answer: No
    NCAA Official Interpretation- Cash in Lieu of Meals in Conjunction with Home Competition (I) [9/27/06] states that it is not permissible to provide cash to student-athletes in lieu of discretionary meals (except for $10 in lieu of a meal following the competition) in conjunction with a home athletics contest. Further, the committee determined that following a home competition, regardless of the timing in which student-athletes are released by the appropriate institutional authority.

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